Highway to Hell

In 16c.-17c. geek c (singular definite geeken, plural indefinite geeks), Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, expert in a technical field, particularly to do with computers, person intensely interested in a particular field or hobby, unfashionable or socially undesirable person, to behave nervously or in a hyperactive state, i eschew the use of "foo" "bar" and other dill-beak, It is totally counter-intuitive. The word comes from English dialect geek or geck (meaning a "fool" or "freak"; from Middle Low German Geck). The root also survives in the Dutch and Afrikaans adjective gek ("crazy"), as well as some German dialects, and in the Alsatian word Gickeleshut ("jester's hat"; used during carnival). By c. 1983, used in teenager slang in reference to peers who lacked social graces but were obsessed with new technology and computers (such as the Anthony Michael Hall character in 1984's "Sixteen Candles"). Is it the ultimate triumph of the Bill Gates era, in which, "Basically," says [Harry J.] geek (third-person singular simple present geeks, present participle geeking, simple past and past participle geeked). his name was synonymous with "a tyrant." In 19th century North America, the term geek referred to a performer in a geek showin a … This page was last edited on 1 September 2020, at 10:52. The first documented case of “nerd” was in Dr. Seuss’s If I Ran the Zoo, in 1950. Probably related to keek. ), founder of cities and builder of the tower of Babel (though Genesis does not name him as such). geek ( n.) a person with an unusual or odd personality; Synonyms: eccentric / eccentric person / flake / oddball. The modern form and the popular use with reference to circus sideshow "wild men" is from 1946, in William Lindsay Gresham's novel "Nightmare Alley" (made into a film in 1947 starring Tyrone Power). Started as carnival slang, likely from the British dialectal term geck (“a fool, dupe, simpleton”) (1510s), apparently from Dutch gek or Low German geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Germanic and Scandinavian meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat" (Dutch gekken, German gecken, Dani… Started as carnival slang, likely from the British dialectal term geck (“a fool, dupe, simpleton”) (1510s), apparently from Dutch gek or Low German geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Germanic and Scandinavian meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat" (Dutch gekken, German gecken, Danish gække, Norwegian gakke, Swedish gäcka); The root still survives in the Dutch adjective noun gek (“crazy" or "crazy person”). The primary meanings of the noun geek, which originated in northern England, are a fool, a dupe, an oaf. "sideshow freak," 1916, U.S. carnival and circus slang, perhaps a variant of geck "a fool, dupe, simpleton" (1510s), apparently from Dutch gek or Low German geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Germanic and Scandinavian meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat" (Dutch gekken, German gecken, Danish gjække, Swedish gäcka). Dork, when used to refer to a socially awkward or inept person, is a relatively recent word: our records indicate that it first appeared in writing in the 1960s. The modern form and the popular use with reference to circus sideshow "wild men" is from 1946, in William Lindsay Gresham's novel "Nightmare Alley" (made into a film in 1947 starring Tyrone Power). Compare gink and also Old Norse gikkr (“a pert, rude person; jester; fool”). It comes from “geck”, an old British term … "sideshow freak," 1916, U.S. carnival and circus slang, perhaps a variant of geck "a fool, dupe, simpleton" (1510s), apparently from Dutch gek or Low German geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Germanic and Scandinavian meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat" (Dutch gekken, German gecken, Danish gjække, Swedish gäcka). By c. 1983, used in teenager slang in reference to peers who lacked social graces but were obsessed with new technology and computers (such as the Anthony Michael Hall character in 1984's "Sixteen Candles"). The word itself, “geek”, came from the word “geck”, which was originally a Low German word which meant someone who is a “fool/freak/simpleton”. According to Online Etymology Dictionary, the word is an alteration of the 1940s term " nert " (meaning "stupid or crazy person"), which is itself an alteration of " nut " (nutcase). Geck is a standard term in modern German and means "fool" or "fop". a carnival performer who does disgusting acts, a person with an unusual or odd personality. It was apparently a variant of geck, of same meanings. Compare German gucken (“look”), kieken (“look”) and the dialectal corruption of Dutch keek (“keek”) (from kijk (“look”)), kijken (“to look”). The specific text was: “a Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too”. Two of its synonyms in this sense are likewise of … A database of player reviews, session reports, images, and news. The word came to mean "geek, klutz" by 1983 in teenager slang, for unknown reasons. "great hunter," 1712, a reference to the biblical son of Cush, referred to (Genesis x.8-9) as "a mighty hunter before the Lord." How do these ubernerds get the cute girls? The term was popularized in the 1970s by its heavy use in the sitcom Happy Days. (Amateur theories include its occasional use in "Bugs Bunny" cartoon episodes featuring rabbit-hunting Elmer Fudd as a foil; its alleged ironic use, among hunters, for a clumsy member of their fraternity; or a stereotype of deer hunters by the non-hunting population in the U.S.). In Middle English he was Nembrot (mid-13c. From wordnet.princeton.edu. Knowles [founder, 'Ain't It Cool News' website], "it's my job to stay on top of the latest and coolest in, expert in a technical field, particularly to do with computers; person intensely interested in a particular field or hobby; unfashionable or socially undesirable person, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=geek&oldid=60203467, Terms with manual transliterations different from the automated ones, Terms with manual transliterations different from the automated ones/ru, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. geek (n.) "sideshow freak," 1916, U.S. carnival and circus slang, perhaps a variant of geck "a fool, dupe, simpleton" (1510s), apparently from Dutch gek or Low German geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Germanic and Scandinavian meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat" (Dutch gekken, German gecken, Danish gjække, Swedish gäcka ). In 18th century Austria, Gecken were freaks on display in some circuses. Geek: Originally the term referred to a carnival performer who would bite the head of animals, most commonly a chicken.

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